© Copyright 2010-2017 Copyright .com - All Rights Reserved - Legal Warning
CANARIANISMS

PECULIAR WORDS TRADITIONALLY USED BY PEOPLE OF THE CANARY ISLANDS WHICH MAKE THEM UNIQUE
CANARISMOS
(Canarianisms)
Canarian Spanish
Canarian Spanish (Spanish: el español de Canarias or el habla canaria) is a variant of
standard Spanish spoken in the Canary Islands by the Canarian people.

The population that inhabited the islands before the conquest, the Guanches, spoke a series
of Berber dialects. After the conquest, a cultural process took place rapidly and intensely,
with the native language disappearing almost completely in the archipelago. Surviving are
some names of plants and animals, terms related to the cattle ranch, and numerous places
in the islands as well as the islands themselves.

Due to their geographic situation, the Canary Islands have received much outside influence,
which has changed its culture as much as its speech.

Archaisms coming from the Castilian of the time of the conquest
Apopar. To flatter.
Balde. Earthenware bowl or bucket.
Besos. Lips. Etm. > Castilian "Bezos" in medieval
Curioso. Careful.
Drago. (Of lat. draco, dragoon). A Canarian tree from the family of the Liliáceas, that reaches
twelve to fourteen meters of height, with small flowers, of greenish white color, a yellowish
berry for fruit. Drago de Icod of Wines is famous, although in the Orotava a colossal dragon
tree existed long ago. Also it is a fable shrub. It is in the legend that when Atlas was dying in
Ladón, the dragon tree protected the entrance from the Garden of the Hespérides, the blood
that flowed from him fell to the Earth. From each one of the drops a dragon tree grew that
way, allowing the millenarian dragon was alive through its multiple children. Guanches
believed them to be magic and used their red and abundant sap in their culture. On the
other hand, the Romans acquired it and sold it for high prices as a cosmetic base.
Recova. Market.
Antier. The day before yesterday.

Words coming from the Portuguese or Galician-Portuguese
Abanar. To wave goodbye with the hand, or to fan.
Aguaviva. Medusa.
Aldoriña. Wanderer (of the Portuguese andorinha, "swallow")
Alongarse. To show himself/herself much or a lot.
Bago. the grain of a grape.
Balayo. type of straw basket.
Cacho. a chunk.
Cambado. Twisted.
Cangallo. Skinny.
Cañoto. Left-handed person.
Coruja. owl.
Cumplido. Extended.
De relance. By chance.
Emborcar. To overturn a container draining its content.
Empenado. That he is not right.
Enchumbado or Enchumbao or Enchumbao. Somebody that is soaking wet.
Engaso. Cluster of grapes without bagos.
Engodo. Bait that is thrown to the sea to attract the fish until the place of the fishing such as
chum.
Engoruñado or engruñao. Bent, shrunk.
Entullo. trash. Of the Portuguese *entulho. Also it is heard say ontullo.
Escachar. To squash.
Escanillo. Drawer of a sowing machine.
Escarmenar. To smoothen hair.
Escarranchar(se) or espatarrar(se). To open your legs.
Fañoso. Nasal speech, or someone that speaks nasally.
Fechadura. Something that this badly done
Fechar. To close.
Fechillo. Bolt.
Ferruje or ferruja. Rust, oxide.
Fonil (from Galician-Portuguese funil, a "funnel", from Latin infundibulum)
Fogalera. Bonfire.
Funchar. To sink, to touch very insistently.
Garuja. Drizzle. Etm. > Caruja in medieval Portuguese.
Gaveta. Drawer (of a closet). Also the glove compartment of a car (of the Portuguese drawer)
Gomo. Bud, gore of orange or lemon (of the Portuguese gomo of laranja, limão).
Jeito. movement that causes pain.
Liga. a shoe lace.
Liña. a clothes line.
Magua. Grief, pain.
Manejar. To lead.
Maneje. Steering wheel.
Margullar. To dive
Mas Nada. Nothing else. Nothing comes from the Portuguese "Mais"
Más Nunca. never again. comes from the Portuguese "Mais".
Millo. Corn. Millo is used instead of maíz (of the Portuguese milho).
Mesturar. To mix (from Galician-Portuguese misturar).
Mojo. Typical sauce of the Canary Islands, Latin American "mojos" derive from the Canarian
mojos. comes from the Portuguese "Molho" (sauce).
Novelo. Ball of yarn.
Payo. Belly.
Peje. Fish.
Rapadura. Typical candy from island La Palma, Canary Islands. Comes from the name
"scraping", perhaps originated in Azores and taken to the Canary Islands (Toscano Mateus,
1953, 398)
Rebotallo. Leftover.
Rente Evenness, to be even or to level something out.
Rolo. Cylindrical body. Cylinder or something cylinder shaped.
Sorribar. To plow the ground.
Tontura. Annoying.
Trancar. To close with key or bolt. (of the Portuguese trancar).
Verga. Wire.
Vergoña instead of verguenza (from Portuguese vergonha, "shame")
Viña Grapevine. or vineyard it comes from the name of the plant (the grapevine). This use
comes from the Portuguese vinha.

Words of Andalusian origin
Afrecho. Bran. Cereal.
Aulaga. Plant.
Candela. Fire.
Cigarrón. Grasshopper.

Words of Guanche origin
A. Definite article of Guanche, equivalent to "The". (Historical, not in use by current
Canarians)
Acot. Nine. (Historical, not in use by current Canarians)
Acot-acotago. Ninety and nine. (Historical, not in use by current Canarians)
Acot-amiago. Thirty and nine. (Historical, not in use by current Canarians)
Acot-arbago. Forty and nine. (Historical, not in use by current Canarians)
Acot-cansago. Fifty and nine. (Historical, not in use by current Canarians)
Acot-linago. Twenty-nine. (Historical, not in use by current Canarians)
Acot-marago. Nineteen. (Historical, not in use by current Canarians)
Acot-satago. Seventy and nine. (Historical, not in use by current Canarians)
Acot-setago. Eighty and nine. (Historical, not in use by current Canarians)
Acot-sumago. Sixty and nine. (Historical, not in use by current Canarians)
Achipenque or achipenco. Person or thing of little value. (Historical, not in use by current
Canarians)
Agamame. Portion of flour.
Arrorró. lullaby. Also the official anthem of the Canary Islands, Used to describe a song or
Lullaby in the Canary Islands, diverse parts of Castile and Andalusia and several countries of
Latin America. A' Ro (or arraw) means young (new born) from there, also translated to native
born little boy.
Baifo. Goat.
Esmira. Crust.
Gánigo. Cup, bowl.
Gofio. Vegetable or cereal flour. Toasted. One certain grain used or it can be of mixed grains.
It has been the basic food of the indigenous Canarians called the Guanches.
Goro. Corral.
Gorón. Circular stone wall, especially to protect to the trees from wind and animals.
Guanil. Wild goat.
Guirgo. hide and go seek.
Guirre. African vulture or Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus. Familia:Falconidae).
Jaira. Tame goat. Also used as an expression to describe a crazy person.
Jalar. To pull
Rebereque. Stories or histories (p. ej. "Déjate of rebereques" )
Sirinoque. A Canarian dance. It is executed to the beat of the drum in pairs making short
jumps.
Tafeña. a type of toasted cereal.
Tafor. Goat's milk.
Tamaragua. This word belongs to the Guanche language and means "good morning".
Tagasaste. Plant.
Tagoror. This word belongs to the Guanche language and means "meeting place".
Tajaraste. A collective dance in Gomera and Tenerife to the beat of a drum.
Tonique/Tenique. A large stone, or boulder
Totufo. Swelling. ("tolete" can be used also like an insult, meaning "idiot").

The Canarian toponymy is full of words of native origin from past times that have been made into
Spanish words, by the Spanish settlers who lived in the Canary Islands and also ones that mixed
with the native Guanche population (for example: Tacoronte, Adeje, Arona, Pay, Guayadeque,
Tuineje, etc).

In addition many names exist in the Canaries that come from the Guanche language (Gara,
Acerina, Beneharo, Jonay, Tanausú, Chaxiraxi, Ayoze, Yaiza, etc).

Native Guanche words coming from Gomera
Aculan. butter.
Aguamame. Type of teething ring made from the root of the majada fern. The native mothers
soaked these roots with butter, fresh cheese and gofio (native toasted cereal) and gave it
their new borns.
Aemon or ahemon. Water.
Alcorac. God.

Guanche words coming from Gran Canaria
Acoran or achoran. God.
Achicaxna. The villain.
Achjucanac. Sublime God.
Achjuragan. God, great gentleman.
Magec. Sun.
Magio. Spirit of the sun, son of the sun.
Alcorac. God.

Guanche words coming from El Hierro
Acof. Stream, river.
Aculan. Butter.
Aguamame. Type of teething ring made from the root of the majada fern. The native mothers
*soaked these roots with butter, fresh cheese and gofio (Native toasted cereal) and gave it
their new borns.
Aemon or ahemon. Water.
Alcorac. God.
Guásamo, guársamo. Cavity conducted in the branches or the trunk of the trees to gather
and to store the water that the leaves distill.

Guanche words coming from La Palma
Abora. God.
Acerjo or ajerjo. Valley, place of waters.
Adago. Milk.
Adey. Underneath, down.
Adijirja. Stream, torrent, spurt.
Ahemen. Water.

Guanche words coming from Lanzarote
Aemon or ahemon. Water.

Guanche words coming from Tenerife
Abugaret. Cave, grotto, depth.
Acichey. Peas.
Acoran or achoran. God.
Achaman. God sun, supreme God.
Achguayaxerax. The spirit of the sky, the spirit who everything sustains, the powerful one.
Achic. Son.
Achicaxna. The villain.
Achiciquiso. The nobleman, the horseman.
Achimencey. Hidalgo, people of the king.
Achjucanac. Sublimate, sublime God.
Achmayex. The mother.
Achuhurahan. The great one (God, great gentleman), has the same meaning and
pronunciación of "achjuragan".
Aemon or ahemon. Water.
Aguere. Lagoon.
Afaro. Grain.
Ahico. Dress, nightgown of skin.
Ahof. Milk (ajof is pronounced).
Ahoren or ajoren. Gofio of barley or liquid food done with gofio, milk and water, used by the
natives.
Aja or axa. Goat.
Magec. Sun.
Magio. Spirit of the sun, son of the sun.

Words coming from Latin America
Aguaitar. To come near.
Atorrar(se). or Vagar. To lie down, usually is used for the patients, just as the term
"enguirrao".
Bacilón or Vacilón. A big party or a big goof off. Hanging out, chillin'. it also means a noisy
racket
Batata. Idiot or clumsy person.
Bembas. Fleshy lips.. Comes from African Influence. (Bemba)Central Africa Bantu People.
Bochinche. or Guachinche tavern.
Cachetada. Slap, blow in the face.
Carretear. To leave to celebrations.
Curado. Drunkard.
Embullo. Animation.
Encachasado. Dirty.
Enchular(se). For one to fix.
Escorroso. Noise, racket.
Espejuelos. Glasses.
Fajar(se). For one to fight. This word may have origins in the Canary Islands or Cuba;
uncertain.
Guagua. A Bus. This word may have origins in the Canary Islands or Cuba; uncertain.
Guineo. Singsong song.
Machango. Doll, or a person badly dressed, or clown; joker. Normally it is used in
contemptuous tone to talk about the way one behaves like a little kid.
Machetear. To collect money.
Mani, Manices. Peanut, peanuts.
Monifato. Niñato Person without experience.
Papa. Potato.. Indigineous AmeriIndian for potato. Potato(Papa) is native to the americas.
Parrandear or Salir de juerga. To leave a dance, party or celebration.
Pendejo. bad word. Means "coward". In colloquial vocabulary it is used to talk about the
masculine or feminine intimate (pubic) hair.
Pibe. Adolescent boy.
Pibón/a or pibonazo. It is used to talk about a good-looking boy or girl with a nice body.
Rascado or rascao. Victim.
Roto. Ordinary.
Singuango. Stupid, silly. (The exact word is Zanguango, not zinguango)
Tenis or playeras. Sport slippers.
Tonga. A lot of something, A large portion.
Traba. [1] Hair pin. [2] Clothes pin.
Vaquita. To collect. To collect or to reunite money between a group of people to buy
something.

Words of English origin
Autodate. Expired. Out of date.
Beberijo. Refreshment (from brew or brewery).
Bisne. Business.
Boliche. Marble. Comes from bowling, from marble bowling balls.
Boncho. Celebration (of a bunch of people).
Cambuyonero. Person who buys and sells items of doubtful origin.
Canchanchán. A good for nothing person, an idiot, or a person who is a disaster.
Concretera. Concrete mixer (of the English concrete Makes specific /kónkrit/).
Creyón. Pencil of color (of English crayon /'kreion/ color pencil).
Chanse. To give the opportunity (of English chance /tSa:ns/ possibility, opportunity).
Flaite. It means of bad class, habitual delinquent.
Flash. Perfumed refreshing drink in a plastic container that read FLASH (from the English
flash /flaeS/ *lightning, sparkle).
Flís. Spray, insecticide in spray, or aerosol (of English the fleas /fli:s/ (fleas)). Due to lice in
the Canary Islands, an insecticide in spray or aerosol called thus was used.
Fisco. A piece, piece. (of piece of /pí:sof/- - > /fí:so/- - > /fí:sco/). Ex. Piece of cheese.
Fonil. Funnel (of English funnel /'fónl/ or the funil Portuguese). Re-introduced and reused in
the Canary *Islands due to the shaken wine commerce of malvasía with England (centuries
XVI to the XVIII), although *according to the Real Spanish Academy (IT ABRADES) it comes
from the Aragonese "fonil", funnel.
Fos!. A bad scent (of English faugh /fo:/ exclamation of loathing or disgust)
Fule. Expression meaning something not seeming right or an act of deceit (from English fool
US /fu:les/ (to deceive us)). ex.: don't fool U.S.! (not to deceive to us, when doing
businesses with the English). And from there, it has derived the expressions like: This is fule
(bunch of bull) ; This smells fule (smells fishy to me); ...
Guachinche. One of the best places to enjoy good homemade food. These establishments
have their origin in agriculturists and cattle dealers determining dates of the year to directly
sell their products (especially when it came from Malvasía) to the English buyer and later to
the local consumer. It also probably has its origin in the English expression "Ím watching!"
/aim wachingye/ meaning, "I observing him" (indicating that the possible English buyer was
prepared negotiate so the actions were closely watched). Any premises or garage was
perfect to sell wine, to serve meats cooking over hot coals or to serve other plates from
traditional Canarian kitchens. Although still exist, many people have turned their failing
businesses into taverns or restaurants. Guachinches are the ideal place to enjoy typical fare
of Tenerife and to request "Pina de millo", and peaches or apricots, and to end off with, a
"Cafe cortado"(Coffee cut with milk), or "leche y leche" (meaning milk and milk, but is coffee
cut with milk and condensed milk). There are many Guachinches north of the island in
Tenerife but the majority is located between Icod of Vinos and Tacoronte-Acentejo.
Guagua. Bus, (Origin Cuba or Canary Islands). Sound of the horns used by the wagons or
buses.
Guanajo. Idiot, stupid. Taino word for turkey. Taino were the native inhabitants of
cuba,Puerto Rico, etc. Turkey is native to the americas. Was introduced to the Canary Islands
via New World (Cuba,etc)
Guanijei. Glass or full glass of liquor, generally whiskey (John Haig whiskey). One John
Haig!/wán dónjei/ (a John Haig). Levánta tu guanijei!
Monimoni or pelas. Money.
Naife or Nife. Knife (of English knife /naif/ knife)
Piche. Asphalt, (of pitch /pich/ (to send, to throw), from asphalt workers pitching asphalt at
someone who made them mad; asphalt: Pitch! Pitch).
Pulover. Sport Jersey or sweater (of the English pullover /pulova/ jersey).
Queque. Sponge cake. (of cake /kéik/ pie).
Sevená. Soda pop. (of English the 7 Up /sevenáp/ above the seven)
Suéter. Jersey type sweater shirt (of the English sweater /'swete/ jersey).
Tenis. Sport slippers (of English tennis shoe slippers to practice tennis).
Tifar. To rob (of English thief /Zí:f/ thief,).
Trinque. Drink (of drink /drink/ to drink). Échate páca trinke!

General terms
Abollado. To be very full (full stomach)
Afilador. Pencil sharpener.
Alberejado. very active, to be up and unable to sleep.
Alegar. To speak much. To criticize.
Añurgar(se) or Enyugar(se). To choke.
Arique. cord.
Arrojar(se). To vomit.
Arveja. Pea.
Asadero. Barbecue.
Badana. Extracted dry skin of the platanera and with multiple uses in: basketwork, crafts,
agriculture, cooperage, etc.
Balde. Bucket (of water).
Barraquito. Cafe with condensed milk, liqueur, cinnamon and rind of lemon.
Belingo. Celebration.
Bobomierda. The word says it all.
Boliche. Marble.
Bogar. To row.
Bolla. Milk bread. Also, to be round in shape; obese.
Boquinazo. Kiss in the mouth.
Bostión. A person who eats too much.
Ca´. slang for house.
Cachimba. Smoking pipe
Cacho or Cachito. Piece of something.
Calufa. Incredible heat
Cambado. Twist.
Canarión. A native of the island of Gran Canaria.
Chácara. Canarian music instrument made of wood.
Chola. Sandal, canvas shoe. Beach footwear.
Caja del Gofio. Stomach, belly.
Canelo. Of brown color, the color of the cinnamon. Object of ridicules, it also talks about a
timid person (nerd). E.g.: "Carlos is a cinnamon-coloured one"
Cañita. a drink.
Cinta Siva. Sticky tape.
Cho/a. Mr. or Ms. (says the folksong: "Échese pácá, Cha Maria,/échese pácá, Cho Jose"). It
comes from the completions of muchCHA and muchCHO.
Chafalmeja. Chaflameja (Contemptuous). A person who does something badly.
Chascar. To eat.
Chicharrero. A native of the capital of Santa Cruz de Tenerife.
Chichón. A very disturbing child.
Chivichanga, chibichanga Penis
Cholas. Slippers or slippers (to go to the beach, the bed, etc.)
Chorba, chorbo. Handsome boy or pretty girl.
Chozo. House
Chupón. A person who kisses ones neck and leaves a mark, such as a passion mark or
hickey.
Colorao. Red
Coneja, repipi. Very pretentious girl.
Cometiar. To look around.
Cotufa. Pop corn.
Damasco. Apricot.
Desinquieto. Nervous. "This boy is a desinquieto".
Derriba. to raise something up.
Echarse el Alpisto. To eat.
Escachao Abollado. Not to have something. Not to have money, broke. "I am escachao"
Emboliado. High from the effects of marijuana.
Empenado. Twist.
Empalicar(se). To talk to someone for a long time.
Encarnao. Red.
Enchumbado. Wet, soaking wet. "Chacho, I am enchumbado" (wet from the rain).
Enfolinado. Running, accelerated, fast.
Enyugar(se). To choke on food.
Fonil. Funnel.
Fos. Expression of bad scent
Fósforo(s). A Match. Pack of matches.
Fuma. Custom to smoke tobacco.
Giribilla. Nervous, in trouble.
Godo. Contemptuous form, which is given to the Spanish peninsula that arrives in the islands
with superiority feelings, despising the customs, the accent, etc. This does not describe all
the peninsula Spanish, only the ones that do not respect the Canaries, nor to their customs.
Golisnear, Golifiar or Goler. To look around, Also it is heard say Gulifiar. It comes from the
verb TO SMELL. Like sniffing around, snooping almost.
Gomo. Bud of an orange or lemon (of the Portuguese gomo of laranja, limão).
Guachinche. One of the best places where to enjoy good homemade food, they call these
guachinches. These establishments have their origin in agriculturists and cattle dealers
determining dates of the year to directly sell their products (especially when it came from
malvasía) to the English buyer and later to the local consumer. Probably it has its origin in
the English expression "I'm watching!" /aim wachingye/ meaning, "I observing him"
(indicating that the possible English buyer was prepared negotiate so the actions were
closely watched). Any premises or garage was perfect to sell wine, to serve meats cooking
over hot coals or to serve other plates from traditional Canarian kitchens. Although still they
continue to last, many people turn their failing business into taverns or restaurants.
Guachinches are the ideal place to enjoy typical fare of Tenerife and to request "Pina de
millo", and peaches or apricots, and to end off with, a "Cafe cortado" (Coffee cut with milk),
or "leche y leche" (meaning milk and milk, but is coffee cut with milk and condensed milk).
There are many Guachinches north of the Island in Tenerife but the majority is located
between Icod of Vinos and Tacoronte-Acentejo.
Guanche. The word guanche, of Guam-chinec, means "person of Tenerife". The pre-Hispanic
settlers of the island lived in caves, were monotheists, mummified their dead, they did not
know navigation and during the summer they shepherded in the Gorges of the Teide. They
called the volcano Echeide and they thought that in its trails the Guayota demon lived. Its
society was hierarchic and was articulated from the mency, the king chosen by a noble
advice. But still its origin is not known exactly, possibly related to the Berber tribe of the
Zanata. There are remains of guanches in Tenerife archaeological finds, but, the spirit of the
Guanche lives on as daily Guanche language words, foods such as gofio and especially in
legends.
Guagua. Bus, omnibus for the urban service.
Guata. Cotton. Of the French "ouate", and this possibly of the Arab "wadd'a", means cotton
lamina.
Guanajo/a. (Contemptuous) Pendejo/a (cowardly person). To become guanajo: to become
the idiot.
Guineo. Slowness. Something that is repeated and tired.
Hablar. To be leaving with somebody, to flirt
Hondilla. Bowl.
Jable. Material of volcanic, whitish origin, with which the culture lands are covered in some
zones of the islands to maintain the Earth's humidity. Also white sand extension in
Fuerteventura.
Jalar. To throw something.
Jaya. To be hungry
Jeringar(se). To get annoyed.
Jediondo. Hediondo, pig.
Jilorio. To be hungry.
Jugo. Juice.
Lasca. Piece that is cut from something. "Échame pácá una lasca de jamón and another one
of cheese".
Liga. Cord.
Llevarse a una tia. To bind.
Machango. Clownlike person.
Mago. In Tenerife, farmer.
Magua. Pain. Grief.
Manosiar. to intimidate.
Margullar. To dive.
Maúro. In Gran Canaria, it means farmer.
Merendero. Zone qualified for the rest and the relaxation or leisure in forest places like
national parks, where you can take your picnic.
Mesturar. To mix.
Mojo. The popular flavorful sauce(s) of the Canary Islands. Canarian mojos accompanied
Canarian emigrants to the Caribbean and South America, where it spread all over Latin
America.
Note/a. Uncle or aunt.
Ñoños. Toes.
Orear. To ventilate, to let something air out. "I am going to orear the clothes".
Par. Two or more (generally more) of something (e.g.: a pair of days - > It can even describe
one week ago).
Papa. Potato.
Pá. Abbreviation of "for." E.g.: Me voy pá Lanzarote. I'm going to Lanzarote.
Pácá. Abbreviation of "for here". E.g.: Me vengo pácá.
Pál. Abbreviation of "for" meaning "to the" in English. E.g.: Este fin de semana me voy pa'l
sur-This weekend i'm going to the (p'al used in place of "to the") south.
Pállá. Abbreviation for "para alla" meaning "over there." E.g.: I'm going to Lanzarote, me voy
pa'llá.
Páquí. Abbreviation for "para aqui" meaning "over here." E.g.: Me vengo pa'qui. short for
para aqui.
Partigazo. Slide, fall to the ground.
Pantuflas. House slippers.
Pelete. Cold. "Que pelete" (how cold).
Pellizcón. Strong tiny amount.
Peninsular. Spaniards who lives outside the islands, or in the Peninsula or Balearic.
Perreta. Annoyance, generally, produced in the children.
Piba/e. Adolescent. Also my is used in the sense of affective relation "pibe; my fiancé".
Pimienta picona. Type of pepper that is used to make the the Canarian hot sauce called
Mojo picón. The pepper is quite popular due to its intense spice.
Pijito. Thorn, nail or sharp projection of small size.
Platanera. Banana tree, or the place where the banana is cultivated.
Playeras. Slippers for the beach.
Potaje. A stew done with meat, vegetables, other ingredients. E.g. guiso or guisado
Regoler. To look around.
Roscas. Pop corn.
Sancochar. To cook in water.
Sancocho. Typical dish of the Canary Islands made up of bacalao fish or fresh fish, potatoes,
and sweet potatoes, accompanied with a pellet of gofio or bananas.
Seguir. To advance.
Seña. Señora
Sopladera. Globe.
Sorullo. Stupid, confused (speech of Tenerife).
Tino. common sense. "He does not have tino", "Borracho fino no pierde el tino" (popular
saying, it means for the drunk not to lose his sense).
Tenderete. Celebration (used mainly in reference to meetings where there is food and
typical Canarian folKlore).
Timple. Small canarian guitar.
Tolete. (1) clumsy, (tonto) (2) Idiot, garbage (like in Cuba and the Dominican Republic.
According to IT ABRADES it) "you are a tolete" (you are an idiot). "What piece tolete!
Tormo. Head.
Trincar. To take, to take hold. "to see if I pick up the fat person" (lottery). "Like trinque, you
will see you..."
Volador. Fireworks rocket.
Vidriosa. Glass marble or bowling alley.
Villero. Native of the town Villa of Orotava (Tenerife).
Zahorra. Volcanic stone with many orifices produced by the shock of the magma from the air
during the volcanic explosion. It is used in construction and decoration.

Name of diseases
Cagalera. Diarrea.
Corte de digestión. Abrupt change of temperature in the body in contact with the water.
Corriente de aire. Abrupt change of temperature in the body in contact with very cold air.
Desmayo. I sneeze or I yawn.
Desmayar(se). To yawn.
Estar escaldado. To have fever.
Estirar la pata. To die.
Finfli or flonfli. Rotten.
Jeito. A pulled muscle, or to pull a muscle.
Tener el pecho atormentado. To have a cold.
Tener fatiguita/jilorio/gazuza. To be hungry.

Animal names
Abade. Codfish.
Aldoriña. wanderer. Of the Portuguese aldorinha
Bucio. Caracol of the sea (conch), but not of the same species that the burgado one.
Burgado. Caracol of the sea (conch).
Baifo. Cabrito.
Cabozo. Fish of the marine, inferior coast to fifteen centimeters in length, of dark color by the
whitish back and by the belly.
Choco. Species of small calamari.
Cigarrón. Grasshopper.
Fula. Small fish of bright colors.
Gueldes. Small fish.
Guirre. Guirhe. Vulture. African vulture or Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus. Familie:
Falconidae).
Jaira. Goat.
Lisa. Type of small lizard and type of fish.
Vieja. Subspecies of the endemic dark-brown fish of the Canary Islands. With the grudges of
pink color. Preferably used in Canary Spanish stews.

Common phrases
Al trancaso. To neglect.
Chacho/a. like saying your buddy. Expression to talk about a person. Ex.: Chacho, is calling
to you!
Chas Vería. Action of astonishment.
Chiquito zaperoco. An expression used to talk about a great uproar.
Choni/Guiri. These terms are used to talk about foreigners in contemptuous tone. Choni
also is used like idiot. The tourist are the foreigners.
Dejarse dormir. To remain asleep.
Déjate Estar. Stay where you are.
Déjate ir!. Go more slowly, please.
Don/Doña or Cho/Cha. It is used instead of Señor/Señora, when one treats a greater
person (he is very typical when it is spoken with the fathers-in-law or an old one).
Echa por la sombrita. Goodbye, it is equivalent to have a good day.
Español Spanish of peninsula Spain, also referring to people or things from peninsula
(usually it is used less than "peninsula").
Eso me dijo, Eso te digo. I say exactly to you what they said me to my.
Estar a mamarla. To be very far; comes from the such Ex: "the town is 100 miles away". And
they answer: "Chos, is to suck it up". (Estar a mamarla)
Godo Contemptuous form, which is given to the peninsula Spanish that arrives in the islands
with superiority feelings, despising the customs, the accent, etc. This does not describe all
the peninsula Spanish, only the ones that do not respect the Canaries, nor to their customs.
Ir al fuego, ir embalado. To go very fast.
Jartar(se) como un cochino. To have an abundance of food.
Jefe. The boss. It is equivalent to sir also used for middle-aged people. Nevertheless the
feminine Female leader is not used .
Mandar(se) a mudar. To go away. "the owner treated me bad and I was sent away" (I left
the work). El dueño me trató mal y me mandé a mudar (me marché del trabajo)
Mas nada. Nothing else.
Meter(se) To fall, to trip.
Muchá. Boy. Comes from Muchacho.
Ni mas.... That large amount of... (Tenerife)
no me jeringues. You don't annoy to me.
Se dijo. So long.
Ño, Nosss, Yasss/yosss! or "chas/chos!. Interjection of surprise or astonishment.
Oh, que pasó?. Greeting, is equivalent to hello. Sometimes, the other responds Then?, like
saying: I'm well and you?
Peninsular. Peninsula Spanish, or anyone or anything from the peninsula of Spain.
Poligonero/a. A person of low social cultural level and status (contemptuous)
Quedarse enroscado en el piso/la esquina. To receive a beating
Quedar largo. When one wears big baggy clothes. (Tenerife).
Quítate la papa de la boca. to vocalize.
Sale pa ya cristiano. Leave me be peacefully
Se me fue el baifo. To confuse, to forget something.
Suéltame Leave me alone; let go of me.
Tranca la puerta. To lock the door with a key.
Ya coño!. Astonishment.
Yo sé lo que me digo. "I understand".
INDEX